Author

Daniel Defoe cover

photo credits: Wikimedia Commons

Daniel Defoe

English trader, writer and journalist

1660   -   1731

country of citizenship: Kingdom of England, Great Britain
languages spoken, written or signed: English
occupation: journalist, novelist, prosaist, children's writer, publicist, writer, businessperson, opinion journalist, poet, publisher

Daniel Defoe (; born Daniel Foe; c. 1660 – 24 April 1731) was an English writer, trader, journalist, pamphleteer and spy. He is most famous for his novel Robinson Crusoe, published in 1719, which is claimed to be second only to the Bible in its number of translations. He has been seen as one of the earliest proponents of the English novel, and helped to popularise the form in Britain with others such as Aphra Behn and Samuel Richardson. Defoe wrote many political tracts, was often in trouble with the authorities, and spent a period in prison. Intellectuals and political leaders paid attention to his fresh ideas and sometimes consulted him. Defoe was a prolific and versatile writer, producing more than three hundred works—books, pamphlets, and journals — on diverse topics, including politics, crime, religion, marriage, psychology, and the supernatural. He was also a pioneer of business journalism and economic journalism.
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