Author

Elliot Aronson

American psychologist

1932   -  

country of citizenship: United States of America
language of expression: English
educated at: Wesleyan University, Brandeis University
occupation: psychologist, sociologist, university teacher, writer
award received: John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, AAAS Prize for Behavioral Science Research, William James Fellow Award, APA Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Psychology, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
student of: Leon Festinger
influenced by: Leon Festinger
aronson.socialpsychology.org

Elliot Aronson (born January 9, 1932) is an American psychologist who has carried out experiments on the theory of cognitive dissonance, and invented the Jigsaw Classroom, a cooperative teaching technique which facilitates learning while reducing interethnic hostility and prejudice. In his 1972 social psychology textbook, The Social Animal, he stated Aronson's First Law: "People who do crazy things are not necessarily crazy," thus asserting the importance of situational factors in bizarre behavior. He is the only person in the 120-year history of the American Psychological Association to have won all three of its major awards: for writing, for teaching, and for research. In 2007 he received the William James Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Association for Psychological Science, in which he was cited as the scientist who "fundamentally changed the way we look at everyday life.” A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Aronson as the 78th most cited psychologist of the 20th century. He officially retired in 1994 but continues to teach and write.
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