Author

Jacques Maritain cover

photo credits: Wikimedia Commons

Jacques Maritain

French philosopher

1882   -   1973

movement: personalismo comunitario, Christian humanism, Christian democracy, human rights
country of citizenship: France
language of expression: French
educated at: Lycée Henri-IV, University of Paris, University of Notre Dame
occupation: philosopher, pedagogue, writer, diplomat
award received: Grand prix de littérature de l'Académie française, Aquinas Medal
position held: ambassador of France to the Holy See
student of: Henri Bergson

Jacques Maritain (French: [maʁitɛ̃]; 18 November 1882 – 28 April 1973) was a French Catholic philosopher. Raised Protestant, he was agnostic before converting to Catholicism in 1906. An author of more than 60 books, he helped to revive Thomas Aquinas for modern times, and was influential in the development and drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Pope Paul VI presented his "Message to Men of Thought and of Science" at the close of Vatican II to Maritain, his long-time friend and mentor. The same pope had seriously considered making him a lay cardinal, but Maritain rejected it. Maritain's interest and works spanned many aspects of philosophy, including aesthetics, political theory, philosophy of science, metaphysics, the nature of education, liturgy and ecclesiology.
Read more or edit on Wikipedia

Series

0

Works

7

The Person and the Common Good

book by Jacques Maritain

author: Jacques Maritain

integral humanism

text by Jacques Maritain

author: Jacques Maritain

1936

Art and Scholasticism

book by Jacques Maritain

author: Jacques Maritain

The Degrees of Knowledge

book by Jacques Maritain

author: Jacques Maritain

The Range of Reason

book by Jacques Maritain

author: Jacques Maritain

De Bergson à Thomas d'Aquin

book by Jacques Maritain

author: Jacques Maritain

1944

Welcome to Inventaire

the library of your friends and communities
learn more
you are offline