Thomas Traherne

English poet

Thomas Traherne (; 1636 or 1637 – c. 27 September 1674) was an English poet, clergyman, theologian, and religious writer. The intense, scholarly spirituality in his writings has led to his being commemorated by some parts of the Anglican Communion on 10 October (the anniversary of his burial in 1674) or on September 27. The work for which Traherne is best known today is the Centuries of Meditations, a collection of short paragraphs in which he reflects on Christian life and ministry, philosophy, happiness, desire and childhood. This was first published in 1908 after having been rediscovered in manuscript ten years earlier. His poetry likewise was first published in 1903 and 1910 (The Poetical Works of Thomas Traherne, B.D. and Poems of Felicity). His prose works include Roman Forgeries (1673), Christian Ethics (1675), and A Serious and Patheticall Contemplation of the Mercies of God (1699). Traherne's writings frequently explore the glory of creation and what he saw as his intimate relationship with God. His writing conveys an ardent, almost childlike love of God, and is compared to similar themes in the works of later poets William Blake, Walt Whitman, and Gerard Manley Hopkins. His love for the natural world is frequently expressed in his works by a treatment of nature that evokes Romanticism—two centuries before the Romantic movement.
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influenced by: Thomas Traherne

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Author

C. S. Lewis cover

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C. S. Lewis

Christian apologist, novelist, and Medievalist

works

51

The Screwtape Letters

satirical, epistolary Christian apologetic novel by C. S. Lewis

author: C. S. Lewis

1942

The chronicles of Narnia

author: C. S. Lewis

Mere Christianity

book by C. S. Lewis on the fundamentals of Christianity

author: C. S. Lewis

1952

Till We Have Faces

1956 novel by C. S. Lewis; a retelling of Cupid and Psyche, based on its telling in a chapter of The Golden Ass of Apuleius

author: C. S. Lewis

1956

The Problem of Pain

1940 book on the problem of evil by C. S. Lewis, in which Lewis argues that human pain, animal pain, and hell are not sufficient reasons to reject belief in a good and powerful God

author: C. S. Lewis

1940

Author

Dorothy L. Sayers cover

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Dorothy L. Sayers

English crime writer, playwright, essayist and Christian writer

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