feeling

conscious subjective experience of emotion

Feeling is the nominalization of the verb to feel. Originally used to describe the physical sensation of touch through either experience or perception, the word is also used to describe other experiences, such as "a feeling of warmth" and of sentience in general. In Latin, sentire meant to feel, hear or smell. In psychology, the word is usually reserved for the conscious subjective experience of emotion. Phenomenology and heterophenomenology are philosophical approaches that provide some basis for knowledge of feelings. Many schools of psychotherapy depend on the therapist achieving some kind of understanding of the client's feelings, for which methodologies exist. Perception of the physical world does not necessarily result in a universal reaction among receivers (see emotions), but varies depending upon one's tendency to handle the situation, how the situation relates to the receiver's past experiences, and any number of other factors. Feelings are also known as a state of consciousness, such as that resulting from emotions, sentiments or desires. Feelings are only felt and are abstract in nature. They cannot be touched. People buy products in hopes that the product will make them feel a certain way: perhaps happy, excited or beautiful. Or, they find the product useful in some way, even indirectly such as to support a charity or for altruistic economic reasons. Some people buy beauty products in hopes of achieving a state of happiness or a sense of self beauty or as an act or expression of beauty. Past events are used in our lives to form schemas in our minds, and based on those past experiences, we expect our lives to follow a certain script. However, storytelling, commemoration and reservation of commemoration (the unwillingness to overtly impose remembrances), research and investigation, and many other activities can help settle uneasy feelings without "scripting", without the ambivalence that feeling can only be "handled" by proxy, which is not always true. A social psychologist, Daniel Gilbert, conducted a study on the influence of feelings on events alongside other researchers. The results showed that when the participants predicted a positive feeling for an event, the higher the chances that they wanted to relive the event. Predicted feelings were either short-lived or did not correlate to what the participant expected.
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main subject: feeling

4

Juste un peu d'amour

Monsieur Noir et Blanc

Moi Aussi, Je Suis Heureux

author: Moira Butterfield

Je t'Aime Comme...

author: Marion Dane Bauer

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